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For better or worse, you’ve upgraded to Windows 11 or performed a Windows 11 clean install , but that doesn’t mean you have to live with all aspects of the new user interface. Perhaps, like me, you hate the new Start Menu because it gives you fewer icons while taking up more space. Maybe you’re enraged that the right-click menus only show you about seven options at a time — and not necessarily the best seven — and then make you click “Show more options” to see them all.

Or you might just want the ribbon back in Windows Explorer. The good news is that, with a combination of registry tweaks, third-party apps and some different art work, you can get a lot of the look and feel of Windows 10 back in Windows The bad news is that Microsoft doesn’t seem to want you to go back to a previous UI so it may disable any registry hacks you use in future updates. Below, we’ll outline a number of tweaks for different parts of the UI and you can use one, several, or all of them to get the look you want.

Windows 11’s Start Menu is a crime against productivity. It is at least pixels taller than Windows 10’s, yet contains fewer icons and forces you to click an “All apps” button in order to get a scrollable, alphabetic list of your programs.

We have a more detailed tutorial on how to replace the Windows 11 Start menu , but your main choices are as follows:. If you install Open-Shell and don’t want to have the bugs you get from bringing back the classic taskbar — an option which we’ll get to below — all you need to do after setting up the program is to shift the taskbar icons to the left. To do that, just right click on the taskbar, select Taskbar Settings and then navigate to Taskbar Behaviors and choose Left from the alignment menu.

Your Start button, which looks like a shell unless you upload a custom one, will then cover the Windows 11 button, and it will work. However, if you want to use Open-Shell and get the accurate Windows 10 Start button icon, you will need to restore the Windows 10 classic task bar and set Open-Shell not to Replace the Start button. The classic taskbar has its own Windows 10 Start button, so it will use that.

If you use Start11 or StartAllBack, you will have some options that allow you to get a more Windows like experience from the taskbar.

For example, StartAllBack, allows you to ungroup taskbar icons and Start11 lets you move the taskbar to the top of the screen while both let you resize the icons. If you are not using either of those Start menu replacements or you want a more classic-looking Windows 10 taskbar, there is a registry tweak that replaces the Windows 11 bar with the Windows 10 one. However, many of the icons on this bar don’t work and need to be hidden or disabled, making this a less-than-perfect option.

There’s a search box, but clicking it does nothing, and you may see a Cortana button that does nothing. The Task View button is worse than useless as it crashes when you click it, causing the taskbar to hide your icons for a minute or two while it recovers, so you should hide it also.

Considering that the Windows 11 taskbar’s Task View and search buttons work, this is a loss of functionality. You also must have a third-party Start menu installed, because clicking the Start button on the classic taskbar will do nothing on its own. On the bright side, enabling the classic taskbar also gives you back the Windows 10 File manager with ribbon and the Windows 10 right click context menus.

However, if you don’t use the classic taskbar, you can get those back in another way, which we’ll explain in a section later. It also allows you to unlock the taskbar and drag it to the sides or top of the screen. If you’re willing to live with the downsides, here are the steps for getting the Windows 10 taskbar in Windows Make sure a third-party Start menu app is installed before you take these steps.

Open Regedit. Close Regedit and restart Windows. You’ll now have the classic Windows 10 Start menu and, if you installed your third-party Start menu, a working Start menu that is more compact than Windows 11’s and has a built-in search function.

However, you’ll notice that the clock, volume control and network icons are missing from the right side of the taskbar. You’ll want to get them back. You’ll have those icons back on the right side of the taskbar, but next, you should hide the icons you can’t use, particularly the Task View button that crashes when you click it. Right click the taskbar and highlight Show Cortana button to make it disappear. One Windows 10 feature you might miss is the ability to maintain separate taskbar icons for each of your windows.

By default Windows 10 and 11 both combine all your windows from a particular program — for example, your web browser — into a single icon, which you must hover over to see the window titles. However, in Windows 10 and — if you use one of the hacks below — you can change this behavior.

The best way to ungroup taskbar icons is to install StartAllBack and select “Never” from the Combine Taskbar buttons menu on the Taskbar tab. If you don’t use StartAllBack and you do have classic taskbar enabled see above , you can ungroup the icons with a registry tweak as follows. You should now see separate icons for every window you have, including and especially browser windows.

Windows 11’s greatest crime against usability is its limited context menus which only show you a few options when you right click and often leave out the most important ones. For example, when I tried right clicking on a. Of course, Windows 11’s solution to this problem is to make you click a “Show more options” link which then gives you the classic context menu.

However, as we explain in our article on how to get full context menus in Windows 11 , there’s a simple registry tweak that will bring the whole menu back. Windows 11’s File Explorer lacks the helpful ribbon menu you see in the Windows 10 version. That’s annoying because many key functions, while still available, aren’t as easy to find. There are a couple of ways to get the old, ribboned Windows 10 File Explorer back.

One of the most non-Windows things about Windows 11 is its default wallpaper, which looks like some kind of flower. Unfortunately, the other preloaded wallpapers aren’t much better as none of them has the famous Windows logo on them. So, even though it is a minor change, getting the default Windows branded wallpaper on your Windows 11 desktop will really make it look and feel like the older OS.

To get the Windows 10 wallpaper in Windows Get the Windows 10 wallpaper and copy it to your Windows 11 PC. If you still have access to a PC with Windows 10 installed, or perhaps you still have the Windows. If you don’t have access to Windows 10, you can find copies of the wallpaper on sites like WallpaperCave. The Windows 10 look and feel would not be complete without using the same recycle bin icon. To be honest, the Windows 11 recycle bin doesn’t look radically different from the old version, but it is a slightly different angle that shows a head-on view of the bin rather than the original, three-quarter view.

Fortunately, you can get the Windows 10 recycle bin icon back, provided that you still have access to a copy of Windows 10 to copy the relevant file from. Grab the imageres. Copy the file to your Windows 11 PC and make sure you put it somewhere you plan to keep it permanently. If you move, rename or delete this file after choosing an icon, you’ll get a blank icon on your desktop. Click the Browse button and select the imageres.

Note that you’ll need to pull down “All Files” selector in the dialog box or you may not see the file listed. Now your Recycle bin icons should be changed. You can always get the old ones back by highlighting them and clicking the Restore Default button. By following all of these steps, you can a Windows 11 interface that looks and feels a lot more like Windows 10, along with some of the functionality you might miss the most.

Unfortunately, there’s no guarantee that all of these hacks keep working as new Windows 11 builds get released. Avram Piltch. Topics Windows. Operating Systems. See all comments Its not even out who cares I’ve read about nor found no major changes, so far at least, in terms of new technologies, file system advances or other improvements under the hood that would lead me to believe that in that regard there is any difference between 10 and 11, aside from the way it looks and handles navigation.

So if you are going to install Windows 11 and make it look like Windows 10, why wouldn’t you just run Windows 10? In the past, making Windows 10 look like 8. All of which ignores the fact that Windows 11 isn’t meant to be used as a primary daily driver OS at this time. It isn’t “done” baking by any means.

It’s not even a “preview” yet. It’s JUST a piece of beta software that Microsoft is hoping everybody will beta test for them, although we already know that any of the actual, insightful feedback they are given will likely not be what makes it into the final pie.

But what if I want it to look like Windows 95? Horse Badorties said:. No need to do that either. I’d be surprised if Windows 11 didn’t work with it, or didn’t work with it for long as there are still independent parties offering some level of support for the product and so far it has worked continuously for every version of Windows It can even make it look and act like Windows 3.

New era of greed Said it before and I’ll say it again: Microsoft needs to stop fiddling with things that work perfectly fine, such as the file explorer, and focus on things which direly need attention, such as Windows Defender scan speed and system resource impact. Start wise I’m fine with the tiled interface, and I was totally against it when it debuted with 8, but as smartphones have become much more commonplace, it doesn’t bother me.

What DOES bother me is Microsoft’s blatant refusal to give us collapsible tile groups and ability to sort tile group contents alphabetically. The changes to file explorer and the context menu, meaningless changes which result in reduced productivity, are as bad as the Ribbon UI. Darkbreeze said:.