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Smartmedia xd.xD-Picture Card

 

Smartmedia xd

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cloud-Based Endpoint Security.SmartMedia – Wikipedia

 

Jul 26,  · The XD to Smartmedia card ad The perfect companion for devices such as a digital camera, MP3 player, Palm/PDA, and printers that use SmartMedia memory cards. Aug 13,  · ENE PCI SmartMedia / xD Card Reader Controller – Driver Download * Vendor: ENE Technology Inc. * Product: ENE PCI SmartMedia / xD Card Reader Controller * Hardware Class: SCSIAdapter. Search For More Drivers *: Go! bit. Windows 10 Bit Driver. : SmartMedia Card Reader Writer All-in-1 USB Universal Multi Card Adapter Slim Hub Read Smart Media, xD, SD, SDHC, SDXC, UHS-I, MMC, MS Pro Duo, CF, MD, Camera Flash Memory Cards For Windows, Mac, Linux: Electronics/5().

 

Smartmedia xd.ENE PCI SmartMedia / xD Card Reader Controller Driver Download – PC Matic Driver Library

Product description the adapter facilitates having eXtremeDigital xD) memory cards be read in SmartMedia (SM) reader/writer slots.5/5(1). The XD memory card to Smartmedia card adapter provides a common data exchange point for XD storage card types. Data can now be easily transferred from XD to any device that can read Smartmedia flash cards. This card adapter is an excellent alternative to connecting a cable to your camera for downloading images/5(43). Aug 13,  · ENE PCI SmartMedia / xD Card Reader Controller – Driver Download * Vendor: ENE Technology Inc. * Product: ENE PCI SmartMedia / xD Card Reader Controller * Hardware Class: SCSIAdapter. Search For More Drivers *: Go! bit. Windows 10 Bit Driver.
 
 
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“Magic bubbles” for computing or a new incarnation of an old idea

According to the source, bubble memory technology, the prospects of which were much talked about in the 1970s, may find a new application – in logical ICs.

Let me take a brief excursion into history: bubble memory was proposed by Bell Labs employee Andrew Bobek in 1967 as a two-dimensional version of the Twister memory device (using the magnetostriction effect), in which, in addition to magnetostriction, the effect of the formation of microscopic circles (“bubbles”) of orthoferrite or permalloy on a special surface (for example, garnet), whose size was many times smaller than the size of the magnetic domains on the film, which has already been widely used in cassettes and reels for recording audio. This, in turn, gave hope for the creation of non-volatile devices of higher density, and Bobek’s group created a storage device with an area of ​​1 sq. cm, which fit 4096 data bits. In the mid-1970s, a real boom in interest in bubble technology erupted – almost all the leading manufacturers worked on commercial implementation of bubble memory, in particular, Intel even released the 7110 megabit chip. However, this boom quickly ended with the introduction of hard drives in the 1980s, which offered higher recording densities and performance at a much lower cost. However, even after that, there were separate devices on bubble memory – a Sharp PC 5000 laptop (1983) and a Konami game console based on the Z80, but work towards the development of bubble ideas was further discontinued.

And now, thirty years later, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology again proposes to use “magic bubbles”, but not ferromagnetic material, but liquid. More precisely – microfluids. As far as can be understood, we are talking about using microscopic amounts of liquid to encode data – a bubble means “1”, its absence means “0”. This technology was developed for labs-on-a-chip – systems-on-a-chip modifications optimized for chemical, biological or medical tests. Using the approach proposed by scientists, it is possible not only to carry out tests, but also chemical reactions with negligible amounts of a substance – from one nanoliter of solution, and the course of the reactions can be programmed using the very bubbles located in the microscopic channels of “laboratories-on-a-chip”.

With the help of such bubbles, it is even possible to program computational operations, however, it seems that the quantum computers mentioned today will cope with the computational task faster and more efficiently. Therefore, most likely, this very curious incarnation of the old technology is destined to remain only in a narrow circle of research and biomedical applications.

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